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Sukhoi Su-25 Frogfoot
Sukhoi Su-25.jpg

Description
Role Ground-attack aircraft
Crew 1 pilot
Passengers
First flight 22nd February 1975
Entered service 1981
Manufacturer Sukhoi
Produced 1,024
Dimensions
Length 15.36 m
Wingspan 14.36 m
Height 5.20 m
Wing area 30.10 m²
Weights
Empty 9,315 kg
Loaded
Maximum takeoff 17,600 kg
Powerplant
Engine 2 × Tumanski R-95Sh
Power (each) 40.17 kN
Performance
Maximum speed 975 km/h
Cruising speed
Range 1,950 km
Ceiling 7,000 m
Rate of climb

The Sukhoi Su-25 Frogfoot is an single seat, twin engine, Soviet attack aircraft developed by Sukhoi. Its main role is close air support.

History[]

Development of the Su-25 began in the early 1960s, following discussions on the need for a new ground attack aircraft.[N 1] In March 1969 the Ministry of Air Industry issued official proposals to four construction bureaux - Ilyushin, Mikoyan, Sukhoi and Yakovlev.[1]

The development team at Sukhoi was led by Shuri W. Iwashetshkin and they submitted a private venture prototype designated T-8, completed in 1974, making its first flight on 22 February 1975 in the hands of Wladimir Ilyushin, who flew the first prototype (T-8-1) in Zhukovsky, which was equipped with RD-9 engines, producing a thrust of 25.5 kN each. This was followed by the T-8-2, a modified second prototype (greater wingspan and modified flaps and stabs), which had its first flight on 26th December 1975, flown by W. P. Walsilyev. Both prototypes were equipped with new R-13-300 engines. But on the definitive aircraft R-95Sch engines were used, producing a thrust of 40.17 kN. Those were built in Tbilis (Georgia), in this factory the series production began in 1978, and the first flight of the T-8-3 aircraft was in 1979. Although the design did not comply with the thinking of the time, the T-8 won the competition, despite needing continued development before it could enter front line service. Sukhoi's desire to test the T-8 under combat conditions resulted in two prototypes - T-8-3 and the modified T-8-1 - being used from April to June 1980 on 44 missions in Afghanistan.

The Su-25 competed with the Ilyushin Il-102, and prevailed itself and was ordered by the Soviet Air Force.

After NATO identified the Su-25 in the year 1977, it was provisionally named Ramenskoje Ram-J. It received the nickname Frogfoot in the year 1981.

References[]

Notes[]

  1. The discussions were prompted by the emergence of new data from localised conflicts, such as the ones in South East Asia, the WarPac67 exercise, analysis of the USAF A-X project (which led to the A-10 Thunderbolt II) and the need for improved survivability and resistance to damage.

Sources[]

  1. World Aircraft Information Files Aviation Partwork. Midsummer Books Ltd. File 269 Sheet 1 (World Military Aircraft:Sukhoi Su-25 'Frogfoot' - Introduction')
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